A Drop Of Power Makes Hydrogen Fuel Cheaper

txchnologist:

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by Michael Keller

**Editor’s Note: There seems to be some confusion based on readers’ comments that this post is about researchers discovering electrolysis of water. That process has been known since the 18th century. This article is about research looking to make industrial-scale hydrogen gas from water using novel electrodes that diminish the amount of electricity and precious metals needed during electrolysis.**

Scientists have made a breakthrough in generating hydrogen gas fuel more efficiently by splitting water with smaller amounts of electricity. 

Stanford University researchers report that they have disassembled water molecules into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen with the electromotive force of a single AAA battery. Both gaseous products are flammable and hydrogen is considered a viable power source for electricity production and vehicles. In fact, the first hydrogen fuel cell cars will be available for purchase in the US beginning in 2015.

The Stanford group also accomplished the low-power water splitting, a process called water electrolysis, without the expensive precious metals typically used. They put two electrodes in a beaker of water and sent current through them, which broke the liquid into the two gases.

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micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.
This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 
African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info

micdotcom:

15 questions white people will never have to ask themselves

Many white people may never truly understand why incidents like the Michael Brown shooting infuriate blacks and other people of color — even when it’s clear that race plays a large, looming role in how the situation snowballed to the 18-year-old’s death.

This is in part because white people can move through daily life without constantly thinking about how their race will be perceived. Part of having white privilege is the freedom from worrying about racism, a freedom their black counterparts have never known. But it gives black people a unique yet challenging perspective by which they navigate the world. 

African-American scholar W.E.B. DuBois called this “double consciousness,” Follow micdotcom

skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

3D Fractals
Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.
Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”
Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.
Zoom Info

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

Scientists must have a vivid intuitive imagination, for new ideas are not generated by deduction but by an artistically creative imagination.

Max Planck (via intj-paradigm)

micdotcom:

16 incredible facts will change the way you think about Africa


1) In the 1970s, Africa’s entire population was one-half of Europe’s. Today, Africa’s population is more than double the EU’s. 
2) More transactions are done by mobile money in Kenya than in the U.S. Kenyans have done $12.5 billion worth of business in the first six months of 2014.
3) Over 100 incubators have been founded in the past 48 months in Africa. And you thought Silicon Valley was the future of technology. 
4) Rwanda ranks highest in the world for number of women parliamentarians at 64%.
Read more | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

16 incredible facts will change the way you think about Africa

1) In the 1970s, Africa’s entire population was one-half of Europe’s. Today, Africa’s population is more than double the EU’s. 

2) More transactions are done by mobile money in Kenya than in the U.S. Kenyans have done $12.5 billion worth of business in the first six months of 2014.

3) Over 100 incubators have been founded in the past 48 months in Africa. And you thought Silicon Valley was the future of technology. 

4) Rwanda ranks highest in the world for number of women parliamentarians at 64%.

Read moreFollow micdotcom